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  • Organization: UNICEF - United Nations Children’s Fund
  • Location: Podgorica
  • Grade: Senior - Internationally recruited position - Senior level
  • Occupational Groups:
    • Protection Officer (Refugee)
    • Animal Health and Veterinary
    • Information Technology and Computer Science
    • Legal - International Law
    • Legal - Broad
    • Social Affairs
    • Human Rights
    • Education, Learning and Training
    • Humanitarian Aid and Coordination
    • Women's Empowerment and Gender Mainstreaming
    • Children's rights (health and protection)
    • Civil Society and Local governance
  • Closing Date: 2015-10-12

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Delivering specialized training on the usage of Child Protection System software for tackling online child sexual exploitation

Podgorica (Montenegro)

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN’S FUND

REQUIRES

International Consultant

for the provision of technical expertise to the Ministry of Internal Affairs in the process of delivering specialized training on the usage of Child Protection System software for tackling online child sexual exploitation

Minimum Requirements:

  • Licence for delivering Child Protection System training to law enforcement officers and entitlement to pass licence to law enforcement officers after CPS training;
  • Ten or more years of experience in delivering training on cybercrime issues;
  • Excellent analytical and writing skills;
  • Previous work experience with UN will be considered as an advantage;
  • Fluency in English (both spoken and written);
  • Strong communication skills;

Terms of Reference

International Consultant for the provision of technical expertise to the Ministry of Internal Affairs in the process of delivering specialized training on the usage of Child Protection System software for tackling online child sexual exploitation

1.Background and Context

Sexual violence against children is a gross violation of children’s rights and yet global reality across all countries and social groups. It can take the form of sexual abuse, harassment, rape or sexual exploitation in prostitution or pornography. It can happen in homes, institutions, schools, workplaces, in travel and tourism facilities, within communities - both in development and emergency contexts. Increasingly, the internet and mobile phones additionally expose children to risk of sexual violence.

The 2014 UNICEF study, Hidden in Plain Sight, estimates that around 120 million girls under the age of 20 (about 1 in 10) have been subjected to forced sexual intercourse or other forced sexual acts at some point of their lives. Millions of more children are likely exploited in prostitution or pornography each year around the world, most of the times lured or forced into these situations through false promises and limited knowledge about the risks. Yet the true magnitude of sexual violence is hidden because of its sensitive and illegal nature. Most children and families do not report cases of abuse and exploitation because of stigma, fear, and lack of reporting mechanisms or trust in the authorities. Social tolerance and lack of awareness also contribute to under-reporting.

In Montenegro, KAP survey revealed, every 10 citizen knows someone who was a victim of sexual abuse during childhood. Yet, only 30% admits that the problem of sexual violence against children exists in the country. This illustrates higher level of social tolerance but also stigma associated with this phenomena that prevents citizen to talk and admit that the problem exists.

According to the Survey of the Ombudsperson Office of Montenegro: “Child Online Sexual Abuse”, 2013, Montenegros institutions registered only 4 cases of child online sexual abuse. In the same survey, every fourth child said she/he had received online messages with grooming or sexting connotation, which data corresponds with findings of the NGO sector. This clearly indicates that Montenegro still does not have in place efficient mechanisms for reporting, revealing, protection, prosecution, neither efficient professional support services for victims.

As part of UNICEF’s commitment to the Convention on the Rights of the Child, Optional Protocol on the Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography and the Rio de Janeiro Declaration and Call for Action to Prevent and Stop Sexual Exploitation of Children and Adolescents.pdf), UNICEF works to prevent and respond to sexual violence by engaging different government sectors - justice, social welfare, education and health - as well as legislators, civil society, community leaders, religious groups, the private sector, media, families and children themselves. UNICEF supports governments in strengthening child protection systems at national and local levels– including laws, policies, regulations and the provision of comprehensive services to child victims and works with communities and the general public to raise awareness about the problem and address attitudes, norms and practices that are harmful to children.[1]

The main international existing instrument in the field of protection of children’s rights, including against sexual exploitation, is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (hereafter CRC, United Nations, 1989). It protects children from all forms of sexual exploitation and abuse, abduction, sale and trafficking, any other form of exploitation and from cruel or inhuman treatment. As to the sexual exploitation of children, Optional Protocol to the CRC on the Sale of Children, Child Pornography and Child Prostitution (United Nations, 2000) is specifically addressing the issue. Compliance with the CRC and its Protocols is monitored by the Committee on the Rights of the Child, which has come to the conclusion that children in Europe are not sufficiently protected against sexual exploitation and abuse. In particular the Committee underlines the lack of exhaustive national criminal legislation in this field in the State Parties, especially as concerns trafficking of children, “sex tourism” and child pornography, the lack of a clearly defined minimum age for consenting sexual relations and lack of protection for children against abuse on the Internet.

Based on the global need for joint and organized fight against this phenomenon and grounded in before mentioned international instruments, We PROTECT Children Online Global Summit was held by the UK Government in London on the 10-11 December 2014 with the aim to strengthen global efforts to combat online child sexual exploitation. It brought together representatives from more than 50 countries, leading technology companies, International and National NGOs, Interpol, Europol, UNICEF, UNODC and the Special Rapporteur on the Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography.

Participating countries signed up to a Statement of Action committing to take global action to identify and protect victims; remove child sexual abuse material from the Internet; strengthen cooperation across the world to track down perpetrators; and build global capacity to tackle the sexual exploitation of children online.

In addition, on December 5th 2012, Montenegro jointly with additional 48 countries, participated in the Initial Conference for establishment of Global Alliance against Child Sexual Abuse Online, which is the joint initiative of the European Union and United States of America. Following objectives were set:Eliminate legal gaps and obstacles; Improve INTERPOLs database with the intention to facilitate cross border police investigations; Strengthen cooperation with civil sector; Strengthen cooperation with internet providers; Integration of legal provisions which will prevent perpetrators of the criminal act of child abuse from further work with children; Provision of efficient support to victims; Raise awareness of children, parents and citizens in general, and in particular through the campaigns in schools.

In light of the above, UNICEF office in Montenegro started with implementation of new initiative aiming to support Government to prevent and protect children from online child sexual exploitation. One the proposed actions of the initiative is to contribute to improvement of the skills and knowledge of law enforcement officers in the Specialized Cybercrime Unite in the Ministry of Internal Affairs by providing them with specialized training on the usage of victim identification software called Child Protection System (CPS). The software provides Law Enforcement officers with data and intelligence which identifies suspects who at the very least are offering to distribute known indecent images of children. The data provided include the IP number, date and time he/she is or was online offering to distribute IIOC, the file titles and their hash values, search terms and much more. Software is provided that allows law enforcement officers to make a single source download (If legal to do so in the host Country) from the suspects file-sharing folder proving distribution offences. The software monitors various file-sharing networks and provides intelligence of users that frequent Internet pedophile chat rooms. It has been responsible for identifying and convicting not only online distributors of child sexual exploitation material but also those that have committed serious sexual abuse against children.

2.Purpose and Objective

The purpose of this assignment is to provide technical assistance to the Government to put mechanisms in place in order to improve system’s response in protection of children from online sexual exploitation, apprehended and prosecuted perpetrators and enable children to enjoy the benefits of the internet free from danger.

The objective of this assignment is to provide the Ministry of Internal Affairs with the benefit of strengthening capacities of law enforcement officers dealing with online child sexual exploitation by:

a) installation of Child Protection System (CPS) software;

b) delivering of specialized training on the usage of CPS software to law enforcement officers;

c) providing licence for using CPS software to those who will pass the training and

d) monitoring process on the usage of CPS software after completion of the training.

3.Methodology and Technical Approach

The methodology will use desk review, consultations with the Ministry of Internal Affairs and respective institutions and delivering CPS training.

The Consultant/s is/are expected to work in the field. He/she will undertake visit to Montenegro in order to deliver specialize CPS training to law enforcement officers. The Consultant/s is/are expected to be entitled to deliver individual licence for using CPS software after completion of CPS training and to provide support in using CPS software after completion of training (monitoring process).

4. Activities and Tasks

The activities of the assignment will be conducted in close cooperation with the relevant representatives of Ministry of Internal Affairs, Forensic Centre, Judicial Training Centre and UNICEF’s Child Protection Team. The Consultant/s is/are expected:

  • To review within the preparatory phase set of national laws and documents: Criminal Code, Criminal Procedure Code, Law on Interior Affairs;
  • To install Child Protection System software to law enforcement officers who will attend the training;
  • To provide 3 days CPS training to selected number of law enforcement officers which will include one day joint training of law enforcement officers and prosecutors (3 days);
  • To provide individual licences to law enforcement officers who passed CPS training;
  • To provide support after completion of CPS training to law enforcement officers who passed CPS training and who obtained licence for using CPS software.

4.Key Deliverables and Timeframe

The Consultant/s will be engaged for the total period of 2 months.

The Consultant is expected to produce the following key deliverables:

a)Install Child Protection Software to law enforcement officers, by 15 November 2015.

b)Conduct 3 days CPS training to selected number of law enforcement officers which will include one day joint training of law enforcement officers and prosecutors

c)Provide licence to law enforcement officers who passed the training (3 days), by 15 November 2015;

d) Monitoring process on the usage of CPS software after completion of the training (two months), by 25 December

e) Final Consultancy Report (1 day), by 25 December 2015.

NOTE: Installation of CPS software, licence and monitoring process should be provided free of charge.

5.Minimum requirements

  • Licence for delivering Child Protection System training to law enforcement officers and entitlement to pass licence to law enforcement officers after CPS training;
  • Ten or more years of experience in delivering training on cybercrime issues;
  • Excellent analytical and writing skills;
  • Previous work experience with UN will be considered as an advantage;
  • Fluency in English (both spoken and written);
  • Strong communication skills;

6.Management and Organisation

Management: The Consultant/s will be supervised by the UNICEF Child Protection Officer. The relevant national stakeholders will be consulted on a regular basis for the feedback regarding the consultant’s work performance.

Organization: International Consultant/s will be required for this consultancy. The consultant will be paid equivalent to P4 level based on Fee range for international consultants CF/AI/2008-003. If more than one consultant is engaged for the assignment, the fee for each consultant will be negotiated depending on their qualifications, the scope of work required from each consultant and the duration of their engagement.

The candidates are requested to submit their financial offer consisting of fee for the services to be provided, travel and subsistence costs, as/ if applicable.

The consultant’s fee may be reduced if the assignments/deliverables are not fulfilled to the required standard. In a case of serious dissatisfaction with the consultant’s performance the contract may be terminated in line with UNICEF procedure in such matters and as spelled out in SSA.

Schedule: This assignment will commence on 25 October 2015.

[1]http://www.unicef.org/protection/57929_58006.html, (07/07/2015).

Terms of Reference for the position and P11 form can be found on the websitewww.unicef.org/montenegro**or picked up at UNICEF Montenegro office.**

If you are a dynamic person who would like to contribute to delivering of long-lasting, positive changes for Montenegro’s children,**please apply with a CV, P11 form, financial offer** and cover letter by email, mail or fax quoting the position “Consultancy on delivering specialized training on the usage of Child Protection System software” to the following address:

UNICEF, UN Eco House, Stanka Dragojevica bb, 81 000 Podgorica

Fax: +382 20 447 400

Email: podgorica@unicef.org

Closing date for applications is 12 October, 2015 by cob (16.30h).

Only short listed candidates will be contacted for interview.

U N I C E F I S A S M O K E F R E E E N V I R O N M E N T

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Before applying, please make sure that you have read the requirements for the position and that you qualify.
Applications from non-qualifying applicants will most likely be discarded by the recruiting manager.
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