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  • Organization: UNV - United Nations Volunteers
  • Location: Georgetown
  • Grade: Mid/Senior - Internationally recruited position - Mid/Senior level
  • Occupational Groups:
    • Women's Empowerment and Gender Mainstreaming
  • Closing Date: 2018-02-12

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Gender Specialist in Guyana

Georgetown (Guyana)

UN VOLUNTEER DESCRIPTION OF ASSIGNMENT GUYR000126--Gender Specialist The United Nations Volunteers (UNV) programme is the UN organization that promotes volunteerism to support peace and development worldwide. Volunteerism can transform the pace and nature of development and it benefits both society at large and the individual volunteer. UNV contributes to peace and development by advocating for volunteerism globally, encouraging partners to integrate volunteerism into development programming, and mobilizing volunteers.In most cultures volunteerism is deeply embedded in long- established, ancient traditions of sharing and support within the communities. In this context, UN Volunteers take part in various forms of volunteerism and play a role in development and peace together with co-workers, host agencies and local communities.In all assignments, UN Volunteers promote volunteerism through their action and conduct. Engaging in volunteer activity can effectively and positively enrich their understanding of local and social realities, as well as create a bridge between themselves and the people in their host community. This will make the time they spend as UN Volunteers even more rewarding and productive.

General Information

Country of Assignment Guyana

United Nations Development Programme

Host Institute

Volunteer Category International Specialist

Number of Volunteer 1

Duration 12 months

Expected Starting Date Immediate

Duty Station Georgetown (GUY) [GUY]

Assignment Place Family Duty Station

1 Feb 2018 Page 1 of 12 Assignment Place Remark Living Conditions

Located in the Northern part of South America, Guyana the “land of many waters” is a unique blend of Caribbean and South American culture and history. With 965 miles of navigable rivers, 83% of Guyana is covered by pristine rainforest. The country is

bordered by the Atlantic Coastline on the northeast, Venezuela on the west, Suriname on the east and Brazil on the West and South. The national language in Guyana is

English. The gross domestic product per capita is US$7,064 (2011 PPP$)[1].

Economic activities are concentrated in natural resources, agriculture, and

infrastructure development. With a land area of approximately 197,000 square

kilometres, close to 90% of the population of approximately 736,000 people (2012

Census) live along the Atlantic coast.

Guyana is known as the land of six peoples. Around 39% of the population are the

descendants of indentured Indian agricultural workers brought in by the British after slavery was abolished. Another 29% are descended from African slaves, brought in by the Dutch to work on sugar plantations. Nine indigenous Amerindian tribes,

descendants of Europeans, Portuguese and Chinese make up a diverse population

mix. This ethnic mix reflects the country's unique history and can be witnessed in its rich culture, diverse food offerings and the local Creole language.

In 1966, Guyana was granted independence, and a government was formed with

proportional representation given to all of the country's ethnic groups. The country is made up of 10 administrative regions, is divided into three countries, Essequibo,

Demerara and Berbice and has four geographic regions; the interior savannahs, the

highland region, the hilly sand and clay area and the low coastal plain. The climate is warm and tropical throughout the year. Rainfall is generally high for most of the year as is the humidity. December to January and May to June are rainy seasons. Guyana is

vulnerable to flooding, especially as the coast is below sea level and although

protected by a sea defence wall, it is not uncommon for water to rise above the wall. Georgetown has changed substantially in the past 2-3 years. Bars, restaurants,

movies, malls and imported good can be easily accessed. The city is generally safe. This said, UNDSS has given Guyana security level 2. This is mainly due to robberies which sometimes are violent. Incidents such as muggings and car theft have also

taken place. It is thus important to take sensible precautions to protect oneself and 1 Feb 2018 Page 2 of 12 ones belongings. It is also recommended that areas such as Tiger Bay and Albouystown in Georgetown are avoided. Other areas such as Sophia precaution is

needed. As in similar contexts, road safety is a concern.

14. Conditions of Service for international UN Volunteers:

The duration of your assignment is 12 months.

A UN Volunteer receives a Volunteer Living Allowance (VLA) which is composed of

the Monthly Living Allowance (MLA) and a Family Allowance (FA) for those with

dependents (maximum three).

The Volunteer Living Allowance (VLA) is paid at the end of each month to cover

housing, utilities, transportation, communications and other basic needs. The VLA can

be computed by applying the Post-Adjustment Multiplier (PAM) to the VLA base rate of

US$ 1,587. The VLA base rate is a global rate across the world, while the PAM is duty

station/country-specific and fluctuates on a monthly basis according to the cost of

living. This method ensures that international UN Volunteers have comparable

purchasing power at all duty stations irrespective of varying costs of living. The PAM is

established by the International Civil Service Commission (ICSC) and is published at

the beginning of every month on the ICSC website (http://icsc.un.org). For example, if

the PAM for the current month is 54.6%, then the VLA for that month will be (US$

1,587 x 54,6 /100) + 1,587= US$ 2,453. Moreover, a Family Allowance (FA) is added

in accordance with the number of recognized dependents: US$ 250 if the UN

Volunteer has 1 recognized dependent, and US$ 450 if the UN Volunteer has 2 or

more recognized dependents. Accordingly, the VLA per month will be approximately

US$ 2,156 for a volunteer without dependent; US$ 2,406 for a volunteer with one

recognized dependent and US$ 2,606 for a volunteer with two or more recognized

dependents.

UNV provides life, health, permanent disability insurances as well as assignment

travel, annual leave, full integration in the UN security framework (including residential

security reimbursements).

UN Volunteers are paid Daily Subsistence Allowance at the UN rate for official travels,

flight tickets for periodic home visit and for the final repatriation travel (if applicable).

Resettlement allowance is paid for satisfactory service at the end of the assignment.

UNV will provide, together with the offer of assignment, a copy of the Conditions of

Service, including Code of conduct, to the successful candidate.

1 Feb 2018 Page 3 of 12 [1] UNDP (2016): Human Development Report, pp 236. Assignment Details

Assignment Title Gender Specialist

Organizational Context & Project Description

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is the UN’s global development

network, advocating for change and connecting countries to knowledge, experience

and resources to help people build a better life. UNDP is on the ground in some 170

countries and territories, working with governments and people on their own solutions

to global and national development challenges to help empower lives and build

resilient nations.

Guyana is extremely susceptible to a number of hydro-meteorological hazards.

Notwithstanding the country’s abundance of freshwater, drought represents a concern

to the country. Agricultural production takes place predominantly in the coastal and

hilly sand and clay regions of the country where the majority of the national population

reside. The coastal region lies below sea level at high tide thus making agricultural

lands very susceptible to floods and salt water intrusion; and the high concentration of

human and economic assets within the low lying Coastal Plain, high intensity seasonal

rainfall and the complex network of drainage and irrigation canals of varying structural

integrity are principal socio-political and biophysical factors responsible for these

vulnerabilities. For the Hinterland region, where floods often affect the farms, most are

situated in the valleys or on hills, often some distance away from the community

centres. After the floods, community members are forced to find a new higher ground

to farm, usually on sandy soil, shifting to cultivate lands even further away from their

communities. This was evidenced in May 2017 floods, resulting in indigenous

communities suffering from landslides, food insecurity, and damaged infrastructure and

farms. The extensive loss of crops within the communities affected the food availability

for the indigenous residents and the concern of potential outbreak of water-borne

illness.

Guyana faces fundamental cross-cutting challenges, with significant impacts on

agricultural livelihoods (crops, livestock, forestry and fisheries), poverty reduction, food

1 Feb 2018 Page 4 of 12 and nutrition security, and causing extra burdens to women who usually maintain and look after the farms. Many rural Guyanese women are farmers and are involved in all

agricultural activities. Men and women in coastal communities have different roles and

responsibilities related to agricultural production. Men are in charge of farms in the

backlands of the communities where they plant a diversity of crops of their choice, both

for subsistence and to sell cash crops. Sometimes women will assist in the farm’s

watering and planting. Both women and men sell produce in the market. Other social

issues such as adolescent pregnancies, domestic and gender-based violence that

have complex root causes including poverty also add burden and hindrances to

women.

A widespread social norm considers men as producers with control over assets and

small businesses; and women as less important stakeholders who process and market

the products, or only as beneficiaries, a perception reinforced by many extension

officers and male farmers. There are no current data regarding women’s involvement in

agriculture, but in 1993 the Bureau of Statistics reported that women made up 18.6% of

the agricultural work force . Legally women are neither denied access to credit

resources nor required to have consent to obtain credit; however, other barriers such

as the demand for high levels of collateral and high interest rates prevent women from

accessing these resources. In decision-making, men tend to be reluctant to be led by a

woman in most communities and women are not given equal opportunities in decision-

making. Additionally, gender issues in indigenous communities are considered to be

highly delicate and sensitive matter.

The Project “Strengthening Disaster Management Capacity of Women in Guyana and

Commonwealth of Dominica” was developed with UNDP Barbados and the OECS

countries to seek to improve the sustainability and resilience of livelihoods and assets

of vulnerable and marginalised groups, including women and indigenous people, by

simultaneously seeking to enhance national-level risk-informed decision making and

community support services they receive, while promoting the application of climate

and disaster-resilient approaches within the targeted communities.

Together, it is expected that this will lead to more secure and productive income

among the target groups, and enable these populations to better prepare for and

reduce disaster losses in future. It will directly contribute to the desired outcome of a

Sustainable and Resilient Caribbean with a programmatic approach for climate change

adaptation and disaster risk reduction in agriculture, implementing DRR strategies in

1 Feb 2018 Page 5 of 12 this sector in Dominica and Guyana. The rights and different characteristics of these groups (e.g. gender, age, poverty levels, culture, etc) will be key factors in the

approach to improving their adaptive capacity. Their active participation and feedback

in the design, learning and application process will help to ensure the interventions are

responsive to their needs, can be sustained, and in particular are accountable to the

disaster affected populations that are acutely vulnerable.

The objective of the project is to support hazard-prone communities, especially women,

in strengthening disaster and climate risk resilience towards enhancing sustainable

livelihoods in hazard-prone communities in Dominica and Guyana.

The objective of this assignment is to provide support to the project in aiming the

reduction of vulnerabilities of hazard prone communities, addressing gender gaps in

hazard and risk data and limited integration of climate change and disaster risk

planning and practice in the agriculture sector and limited access to appropriate,

sustainable finance for vulnerable small farmers and women’s groups.

The Gender Specialist (GS) is responsible for technical inputs to all project activities to

ensure effective analysis and responsiveness to the differential needs of men, women,

boys and girls, in accordance with the existing gender strategy, including capacity

building, and assuring the respective quality of activities in the field in Guyana. GS is

also responsible for providing technical advice and mentoring to beneficiaries and

national counterparts, in close coordination with UNDP oversight staff. She or he will

be part of Guyana Project Management Unit, closely working with the Project Manager

and Associate directly responsible for managing the project. Additionally, GS is

expected to closely work with IUNV Gender Specialist, assigned to Dominica, and

liaise with UNOSAT team.

Sustainable 13. Climate Action

Development Goals

UNV Focus Area Community resilience environment & disaster reduction

Task description

Under the direct supervision of the Programme Analyst – Environment, Extractive

Industry and Energy, the UN Volunteer will undertake the following tasks:

Capacity development of responsible parties:

1 Feb 2018 Page 6 of 12 Conduct capacity development workshops, visits and awareness raising sessions to promote and ensure gender-responsiveness of the design, plan

and implementation of the activities under Output 1 and 2. The UNV is

expected to conduct capacity development particularly with Hydrogeological

Services, the Ministry of Agriculture, Civil Defense Commission and the

Gender Bureau of the Ministry of Social Protection; and

Develop materials and work closely with the Gender Bureau for the above-

mentioned government agencies and other institutions and hazard-prone

communities.

Conduct capacity development workshops, visits and awareness raising

sessions to promote gender equality and gender mainstreaming in hazard-

prone communities.

Update and Finalize the Draft Gender Strategy:

Review the draft Gender Strategy, which is currently under review by FAO

Gender Specialist; and,

In close consultation with the FAO and Gender officer from UNDP Regional

Hub, update (where required) the situational analysis, and determine priorities

for Guyana through workshops.

Provide Technical Support for the design, planning and implementation of project

activities under Output 1, 2 and 3:

Develop Standard Operating Procedures for mainstreaming gender in all

activities;

Ensure that the priorities of the Gender Strategy are integrated into the project

activities and responsible government agency and UNOSAT’s action plans;

Develop an action plan, inclusive of activities from Output 1 and 2, budget,

timelines together with responsible parties for the implementation of the

Gender Strategy; and,

Design sex-desegregated data collection and monitoring system with

extension arms under the Ministry of Agriculture;

Provide Technical and Logistical Support to knowledge exchanges (Output 3);

and,

Liaise with the Embassy of Japan in Trinidad.

Furthermore, UN Volunteers are required to:- Strengthen their knowledge and

understanding of the concept of volunteerismby reading relevant UNV and external

1 Feb 2018 Page 7 of 12 publications and take active part in UNVactivities (for instance in events that mark International Volunteer Day)- Be acquainted with and build on traditional and/or local

forms ofvolunteerism in the host country- Reflect on the type and quality of voluntary

action that they areundertaking, including participation in ongoing reflection activities-

Contribute articles/write-ups on field experiences and submit them for

UNVpublications/websites, newsletters, press releases, etc.- Assist with the UNV

Buddy Programme for newly-arrived UN Volunteers- Promote or advise local groups in

the use of online volunteering, orencourage relevant local individuals and organizations

to use the UNV OnlineVolunteering service whenever technically possible.

Results/Expected Outputs

Periodical report and accompanying materials on mainstreaming activities on

gender equality;

Finalised draft Gender Strategy in Disaster Risk Reduction in the Agriculture

Sector for Guyana;

The development of capacity to mainstream gender responsive decision making

for disaster preparedness through coaching, mentoring and formal on-the-job

training, when working with project staff or (non-) governmental counterparts,

including Implementing Partners (IPs);

Provision of technical inputs and guidance to ensure all activities are designed,

planned and implemented in a way that are gender-responsive;

A final statement of achievements towards volunteerism for Community resilience

for Environment and Disaster Risk Reduction during the assignment, such as

reporting on the number of volunteers mobilized, activities participated in and

capacities developed.

• The development of capacity through coaching, mentoring and formal on-the-job

training, when working with (including supervising) national staff or (non-)

governmental counter-parts, including Implementing Partners (IPs); • Age, Gender and

Diversity (AGD) perspective is systematically applied, integrated and documented in all

activities throughout the assignment • A final statement of achievements towards

volunteerism for peace and development dur-ing the assignment, such as reporting on

the number of volunteers mobilized, activities participated in and capacities developed

Qualifications/Requirements

1 Feb 2018 Page 8 of 12 Required Degree Level Master degree or equivalent

Education - Additional Comments

A Master’s degree is required, preferably in environmental management, climate

change, disaster risk reduction, gender studies, and/or social science from a

recognized university

Required experience 60 months

Experience Remark

Have proven experience in mainstreaming gender activities in project or

programme

Have at least 5 years experience in implementing gender-based activities

Have previous professional experience with national and sub-national institutions

and indigenous communities.

Ability to work with minimal supervision.

Professional experience in international organisation would be an advantage.

Language Skills

English (Mandatory) , Level - Fluent

Area of Expertise

Disaster risk reduction Mandatory

Gender equality and the advancement of women Mandatory

Area of Expertise Requirement

Need Driving Licence No

Competencies & Values

Accountability

Adaptability and Flexibility

Commitment and Motivation

1 Feb 2018 Page 9 of 12 Commitment to Continuous Learning

Communication

Integrity

Planning and Organizing

Professionalism

Conditions of Service and other information

Condition of Service Click here to view Conditions of Service

Conditions of Service for International Specialist:

The contract lasts for the period indicated above with possibility of extensions subject to

availability of funding, operational necessity and satisfactory performance. However, there

is no expectation of renewal of the assignment.

A UN Volunteer receives a Volunteer Living Allowance (VLA) which is composed of the

Monthly Living Allowance (MLA) and a Family Allowance (FA) for those with dependents

(maximum three).

The Volunteer Living Allowance (VLA) is paid at the end of each month to cover housing,

utilities, transportation, communications and other basic needs. The VLA can be

computed by applying the Post-Adjustment Multiplier (PAM) to the VLA base rate of US$

1,587. The VLA base rate is a global rate across the world, while the PAM is duty

station/country-specific and fluctuates on a monthly basis according to the cost of living.

This method ensures that international UN Volunteers have comparable purchasing power

at all duty stations irrespective of varying costs of living. The PAM is established by the

International Civil Service Commission (ICSC) and is published at the beginning of every

month on the ICSC website http://icsc.un.org.

1 Feb 2018 Page 10 of 12For example, kindly enter the link Calculator

In non-family duty stations that belong to hardship categories D or E, as classified by the

ICSC, international UN Volunteers receive a Well-Being Differential (WBD) on a monthly

basis.

Furthermore, UN Volunteers are provided a settling-in-grant (SIG) at the start of the

assignment (if the volunteer did not reside in the duty station for at least 6 months prior to

taking up the assignment) and in the event of a permanent reassignment to another duty

station.

UNV provides life, health, permanent disability insurances as well as assignment travel,

annual leave, full integration in the UN security framework (including residential security

reimbursements).

UN Volunteers are paid Daily Subsistence Allowance at the UN rate for official travels,

flight tickets for periodic home visit and for the final repatriation travel (if applicable).

Resettlement allowance is paid for satisfactory service at the end of the assignment.

UNV will provide, together with the offer of assignment, a copy of the Conditions of

Service, including Code of conduct, to the successful candidate.

Application Code GUYR000126-2467

Application procedure

* Not yet registered in the UNV Talent Pool?

1 Feb 2018 Page 11 of 12Please first register your profile at https://vmam.unv.org/candidate/signup. Important: After creating your account, complete all sections of your profile and

submit it. Then go to ‘My Page’ at https://vmam.unv.org/candidate/mypage and click

on the ‘Special Calls’ hyperlink. Lastly, select the special call to which you would

like to apply.

* Already registered in the UNV Talent Pool?

Please first update your profile at https://vmam.unv.org/candidate/profile. Then go

to ‘My Page’ at https://vmam.unv.org/candidate/mypage and click on the ‘Special

Calls’ hyperlink to select the special call to which you would like to apply.

IMPORTANT: Candidates may apply to a maximum of three (3) special calls per

advertisement. Your order of preference may be specified in the ‘Additional

Remarks’ section of your profile.

Application deadline: 12-02-2018.

Disclaimer

United Nations Volunteers is an equal opportunity programme which welcomes

applications from qualified professionals. We are committed to achieving diversity in terms

of gender, nationality and culture.

1 Feb 2018 Page 12 of 12

We do our best to provide you the most accurate info, but closing dates may be wrong on our site. Please check on the recruiting organization's page for the exact info. Candidates are responsible for complying with deadlines and are encouraged to submit applications well ahead.
Before applying, please make sure that you have read the requirements for the position and that you qualify.
Applications from non-qualifying applicants will most likely be discarded by the recruiting manager.
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