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International Consultant for Final Project Evaluation

Home Based - May require travel (Home Based)

  • Organization: UNDP - United Nations Development Programme
  • Location: Home Based - May require travel (Home Based)
  • Grade: International Consultant - Internationally recruited Contractors Agreement - Consultancy
  • Occupational Groups:
    • Monitoring and Evaluation
    • Project and Programme Management
  • Closing Date: 2020-10-26

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Background

NOTE: Signed Offeror’s Letter to UNDP Confirming Interest and Availability - https://www.ba.undp.org/content/dam/bosnia_and_herzegovina/docs/Operations/Jobs/Offerors%20Letter%20to%20UNDP%20Confirming%20Interest%20and%20Availability.docx - Letter to UNDP Confirming Interest and Availability.docx - to be sent to e-mail ba.shared.hr@undp.org with Subject: Job ID 94666.

From an energy consumption perspective, Bosnia and Herzegovina is characterized as a country with very high inefficiency within the residential, non-residential/public, industry, and service sector. At the same time, Bosnia and Herzegovina has one of the most significant energy conservation potentials in the region and could base its further mid-term economic development and generation of new employment on energy efficiency improvement measures in the residential and public sector. Moreover, the average energy consumption of a public building in Bosnia and Herzegovina is three times higher than the average in the countries of the European Union (EU). In accordance with the EU Eco-Management and Audit Scheme – EMAS, public buildings across the country are categorized as completely energy inefficient. In order to meet energy intensive consumption demands, a significant amount of budget funds must be allocated for energy expenditures of public buildings (educational, health, cultural, municipal and entity/state institutions etc.) representing a major proportion of the already inadequate public budget.

The energy sector in Bosnia and Herzegovina is organized according to the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina, positioning the entity line ministries (of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and Republika Srpska) as the key players in the Energy Efficiency / Renewable Sources framework while giving the state-wide level, represented by the Ministry of Foreign Trade and Economic Relations of Bosnia and Herzegovina a coordinating/reporting role for multilateral binding agreements. As such, the direct implementation of the Energy Efficiency / Renewable Sources related activities and EU acquis[1] (such as achieving energy saving targets, energy monitoring, enforcements of legislations, financing mechanisms etc.) is to be carried out on the entity/cantonal levels.

Bosnia and Herzegovina adopted the National Energy Efficiency Action Plan for the period of 2016-2018, while the next Plan 2019-2021 should be adopted by the end of 2020 and National Energy and Climate Plan for the period of 2021-2030 is in drafting phase. These are the important steps towards fulfilling the requirements from the Energy Community Treaty[2]. In addition, Framework Energy Strategy of Bosnia and Herzegovina until 2035 was adopted in August 2018, creating conditions to draw IPA funds and funds from the Western Balkans Investment Framework (WBIF) for the energy sector, as well as to attract investors to the sector. Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina has adopted updated the Renewables Action Plan in November 2018 and set tentative targets for the share of renewable energy in the total final consumption in the heating and cooling, electricity, and transportation sectors until 2020. At the end of 2018, two regulations regarding energy efficiency certification of buildings were adopted: Decree on the conditions for granting and revoking authorizations for performing energy audits and energy certification of buildings, and Decree on conducting energy audits and issuing energy certificates in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. In 2019, the Rulebook on energy efficiency information system and energy management in Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina was adopted. Adoption of the relevant legislative and strategic frameworks in the area of energy management sets foundations for further development of energy efficiency, renewable energy, and energy management sector in the country, however there is a lot of work ahead in order to fulfil all obligations in accordance with the Energy Community Treaty.

Country context related to COVID – 19. On March 11, 2020 the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. While the disease was slow to spread to Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Western Balkan countries at first, since February 2020 the number of confirmed cases is climbing rapidly. A state of emergency was declared in Bosnia and Herzegovina by both entity governments on 16 March 2020[3] and at the state level – on 17 March 2020[4]

While new cases continue to appear throughout Bosnia and Herzegovina and in steady numbers, the stabilization trendline is visible with a plateau which currently allows the health system to maintain control and sufficient response capacities. The number of active daily cases per 100,000 population is estimated at 178,8 (8th September); and the weekly number of new cases per 100,000 population at 51,50 (first week of September). Confirmed cases in Bosnia and Herzegovina, as reported on 8 September 2020, is 21,961 and deaths reported as associated with covid-19 is 669. The R-factor (or reproduction number, indicating the number of people that one infected person will pass the virus on to, on average) has dropped to 1.04 for Bosnia and Herzegovina in the past two weeks, signalling a manageable epidemiological situation.

COVID situation has had a significant impact on the project implementation, particularly in the part of Energy Efficiency / Renewable Sources infrastructure measures in public buildings and public lighting systems. Infrastructural measures account for approximately 74% of the total 2020 project delivery target. Moreover, for the infrastructure works, the co-financing from local governments must be ensured in the amount from 50% to 70% of the total value of the investment which was challenging from the beginning of the COVID - 19 situation. In general, there are still present uncertainties in the budgets of the sub-national/local governments planned for infrastructure works for energy efficiency and renewable energy measures.

About the Project

Project title

Green Economic Development 2nd phase

Atlas ID

00105415

Corporate outcome and output

UNDP Strategic Plan Outcome 1; Output 2.5.2

Country

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Date project document signed

24.01.2018.

Project dates

1 February 2018

28 February 2021

Beginning

End

Project budget

20.5 mill USD

Project expenditure at the time of evaluation

9,283,901

Funding source

Government of Sweden and Local Governments

Implementing party

UNDP

Funded by the Government of Sweden, the Green Economic Development 2nd phase (GED II) project, contributes to faster creation of an environment attractive for Energy Efficiency / Renewable Sources  investments in the public and residential sector, generation of new employment and creation of clear energy monitoring and targets achieving mechanisms in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The project is a follow up to the Green Economic Development project (September 2007 - December 2022).

The overall objective of the Green Economic Development 2nd phase project is to contribute to creation of a favorable environment for investing in Energy Efficiency / Renewable Sources infrastructure measures in Bosnia and Herzegovina, thus contributing to Bosnia and Herzegovina’s EU accession process, targeting the Energy Performance Building Directive, Energy Efficiency Directive and Renewable Energy Directive. The project specific objectives/outcomes focus on enabling all levels of governments in Bosnia and Herzegovina to monitor, analyze and evaluate energy consumption, costs, emission, energy investments and savings data from public sector buildings, as well as to support energy efficiency and renewable energy targets (in accordance with the Energy Community Treaty and its obligations) by providing financial support to Energy Efficiency / Renewable Sources infrastructure works.

Specifically, the project outcomes are:

Outcome 1: To develop capacity and strengthen skills of Environmental Fund staff;

Outcome 2:  To develop capacity and strengthen skills of energy professionals;

Outcome 3: To establish energy monitoring and reporting mechanisms in Bosnia and Herzegovina;

Outcome 4: To enable financing for Energy Efficiency / Renewable Sources infrastructure projects in Bosnia and Herzegovina;

Outcome 5: To implement cost-optimal, green jobs generating and emission reducing Energy Efficiency / Renewable Sources infrastructure projects in Bosnia and Herzegovina;

Outcome 6: To increase general public’s understanding of Energy Efficiency / Renewable Sources benefits;

Outcome 7: To provide access to energy for off grid households in Bosnia and Herzegovina. 

Detailed outline of the Project Result Framework is available in Annex 1. 

Partnerships: Project Board, consisted of representatives from the Ministry of Foreign Trade and Economic Relations of Bosnia and Herzegovina and both entity Environmental Funds, is responsible for providing strategic guidance and overseeing the Green Economic Development 2nd phase project implementation. The project partners with different levels of governments in Bosnia and Herzegovina to implement specific project components. Green Economic Development 2nd phase project created partner relationships with 8 Cantonal and 35 Local Governments for the purpose of implementation of infrastructural works. Additionally, the project has a successful partnership with relevant entities ministries in the field of energy and environmental protection with whom it works closely on capacity building and development of reporting mechanisms. Overview of key stakeholders and partners and their roles in evaluation is provided in Annex 2.

Target groups and beneficiaries: Final beneficiaries of the Green Economic Development 2nd phase project are the users of public buildings, health, educational and cultural institutions in which the infrastructural works on improvement of energy efficiency are implemented, citizens and local communities in participating local governments with improved public lightning systems, municipal authorities with reporting mechanisms in place, and public sector buildings monitored through Energy Management Information System (EMIS). It is expected that by the end of the project, 90 municipal authorities will have the reporting mechanisms in place and that 7,000 public sector buildings will be monitored through EMIS database and trained on EMIS use, 600 stakeholders participated in the training programme for energy management, skills and knowledge development, as well as 24 households provided with renewable energy solutions in off grid areas in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Main achievements: In two years of the project implementation, infrastructure measures on improvement of energy efficiency were implemented on 54 public buildings in 27 local governments, benefitting more than 300.000 citizens. Six local governments have improved public lightning systems, ensuring more secure surroundings for the citizens. Photovoltaic solar systems were installed in 16 returnee households. Sixteen of grid returnees’ households without electricity, living in remote areas of Bosnia and Herzegovina now have access to their own electricity for basic domestic use.

Project’s relevance and alignment: The project is aligned with the national and UNDP development frameworks and goals (United Nations Development Framework for Bosnia and Herzegovina 2015-2020 and UNDP Country Programme Document 2015 - 2020). It contributes to targets set within the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG): 7-Affordable and Clean Energy, 8-Decent Work and Economic Growth, 11-Sustainable Cities and Communities and 13-Climate Action. Overview of relevant documentation is provided in Annex 3.

[1] Energy Community acquis: https://www.energy-community.org/legal/acquis.html

[2]Treaty establishing Energy Community: https://www.energy-community.org/legal/treaty.html

[3] Sources: Government of Republika Srpska, Government of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

[4] Source: Decision of the Council of Ministers of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Duties and Responsibilities

Purpose

The purpose of this evaluation is to provide an impartial review of the Green Economic Development 2nd phase project in terms of its relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, impact, sustainability, management and achievements. The information, findings, lessons learned and recommendations generated by the evaluation will be used by the Project Board, UNDP, Government of Sweden and other relevant stakeholders to strengthen the remaining project implementation and inform future programming.

Objective

The evaluation objective is to examine the overall performance of the Green Economic Development 2nd phase project, its results, inputs and activities, and how the outputs delivered added value to target groups and institutional beneficiaries. In a substantive analysis of the effectiveness of the project approach and feedback from beneficiaries and relevant stakeholders, the evaluation should assess cause and effect relations within the project, identifying the extent to which the observed changes can be attributed to the project. In addition, this evaluation aims to provide forward-looking recommendations to the Government of Sweden and UNDP in the field of energy management in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Scope

The evaluation will assess the extent to which the planned project specific outcomes and outputs have been achieved since the beginning of the project and likelihood for their full achievement by the end of the project on 28 February 2021 (based on the Project Document and its results framework). The evaluation will look into the overall project performance and results, covering its empirical human development effects which emerged in the healthcare, education, safety and security, transparency and gender areas as a result of the implementation of energy efficiency measures in more than 54 public sector buildings across Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Specifically, the evaluation will look into critical project’s aspects, such as policy and legislative support in the area of energy management, development of financial mechanism and improved investment environment for green economic development and generation of employment.  To the extent possible, it will also consider the relevance and influence of implemented infrastructure projects on the individuals and groups within the project’s targeted localities.

The evaluation will look into the project’s processes, innovations, strategic partnerships and linkages in the specific country’s context, that proved critical in producing the intended outputs and the factors that facilitated and/or hindered the progress in achieving the outputs, both in terms of the external environment and risks, as well as internal, including: weaknesses in project design, management, human resource skills, and resources.

Finally, the evaluation will assess how has the project adjusted its implementation strategy and approach to respond to new circumstances imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic.

I.Evaluation criteria and key questions

The Green Economic Development 2nd phase project evaluation is to answer the following questions, so as to determine the project’s relevance, performance, results, effectiveness, efficiency, impact and sustainability, including lessons learned and forward-looking recommendations. The evaluation questions are summarized below.

Relevance

  • Were the project’s objectives relevant to the needs of the project beneficiaries, having in mind political, social, and institutional context of the country, and what are the project’s potentials to adequately contribute to development processes in the future?
  • To what extent is the project aligned with the relevant national development frameworks, and UNDP strategic objectives and Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) 7-Affordable and Clean Energy, 8-Decent Work and Economic Growth, 11-Sustainable Cities and Communities and 13-Climate Action?
  • To what extent is gender equality respected and mainstreamed within the project implementation?
  • To what extent does the project contribute to human rights of target groups?
  • What steps has the project taken to adjust its implementation strategy and approach to new circumstances imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic?

Effectiveness

  • To what extent were the project’s activities implemented and intended results achieved? What are the main project’s accomplishments? Overview of the project progress against project indicators is to be provided in an Annex of the Evaluation Report.
  • To what extent have the project’s actions contributed to intended outcomes of the requisite quality and are they effective? If so, why? If not, why not?
  • What are the positive or negative, intended or unintended, changes brought about by the project’s interventions? This may, inter alia, include an overview of the number of beneficiaries benefiting from the energy efficiency infrastructure projects implemented in public buildings, low emission objectives addressed, level of local governments’ co-financing and other.
  • To what extent has the project contributed to strengthening partnership between relevant institutions?
  • How effective are the results achieved by the projects (for local/municipality/Cantonal/Entity levels of Bosnia and Herzegovina), considering bifurcated approach to selection in Bosnia and Herzegovina?
  • To what extent did the project’s actions facilitate improvement of legislation and transposition of EU Directives related to energy management?
  • To what extent has the project managed to institutionalize and anchor the Methodology of data entry and reporting using the Energy Management Information System in Bosnia and Herzegovina?
  • To what extent and through what mechanisms has the project managed to promote participatory decision making and transparent project-based funding of energy efficiency measures in public buildings, co-financed from government budgets?
  • To what extend has the project outreached marginalized groups (i.e. youth, persons with disabilities, returnees, internally displaced, minorities…) and supported gender mainstreaming and women’s empowerment?

Efficiency

  • Have resources (financial, human, technical) been allocated strategically to achieve the project results?
  • Are there any weaknesses in project design, management, human resource skills, and resources?
  • To what extent the support to governments and institutions as implementing partners has shown to be an efficient implementation modality?
  • To what extent have the target groups and other stakeholders taken an active role in implementing the project? What modes of participation have taken place? How efficient have partner institutions been in supporting the project implementation?
  • Were the project activities implemented as scheduled and with the planned financial resources?
  • Where there any duplication of efforts?

Impact

  • What are the project effects and impact in terms of implemented energy efficiency measures, both in qualitative, as well as quantitative terms, on the overall improvement of quality of life of citizens in targeted areas?
  • What are the main benefits (qualitative and quantitative) for target groups and beneficiary institutions?
  • To what extent are key stakeholders/final beneficiaries satisfied with the project implementation, specifically in terms of the partnership support and what are specific expectations for the potential follow-up assistance?
  • What are the overall project effects and impact in relation to the governments’ capacities to improve funding for energy management, the culture of transparency and participatory decision-making?
  • To what extent has the project elevated cooperation between relevant institutions?
  • How have cross-cutting issues, such as gender, disability, and reaching the most vulnerable children, been effectively taken up?
  • What is the impact of COVID-19 on the project implementation and how the limitations imposed by the pandemic were lifted?

Sustainability

  • To what extent are the project outcomes and outputs sustainable? How could project results be further sustainably projected and expanded, having in mind the potential future contribution of financing mechanism for improvement of energy efficiency?
  • To what extent has the project approach (intervention strategy) managed to create ownership of the key national stakeholders?
  • To what extent have the capacities of relevant government institutions been strengthened to sustain the results of the project? Which are, in this regard, challenges to overcome or potentials to be unlocked in the future?
  • What would be directions to expand positive effects of the project’s concept in the area of inclusive public services, and gender equality in the future?
  • At this stage of project implementation, what could be possible after-project priority interventions and general recommendations, which could further ensure sustainability and scaling up of project’s achievements?
  • What would be future priority interventions to ensure long-term sustainability of the project’s achievements and contribute to further development of energy management and energy efficiency, having in mind the current COVID- 19 circumstances?

Coherence

  • How effective was the project’s interaction with other complementary projects, specifically other initiatives funded by the Government of Sweden in order to trigger synergies maximizing development results?

The evaluation shall further assess:

  • If the project has had any positive or negative effects on gender equality? Could gender mainstreaming have been improved in planning, implementation or follow up?
  • If the project has been implemented in accordance with a human rights perspective: i.e. Have target groups been participating in project planning, implementations and follow up? Has anyone been discriminated by the project through its implementation? Has the project been implemented in a transparent fashion? Are there accountability mechanisms in the project?
  • To what extent is poverty, in its different dimensions, addressed in the design, implementation and follow up of the intervention? What/which dimensions are addressed? How could the intervention be strengthened so that poverty reduction is more explicitly addressed?
  • Has the media coverage Has the communication and outreach of the Project been satisfactory?

The evaluation needs to assess the degree to which the project initiatives have supported or promoted gender equality, a rights-based approach, and human development. In this regard, United Nations Evaluation Group’s guidance on Integrating Human Rights and Gender Equality in Evaluation should be consulted.

II.Methodology:

Based on the UNDP Evaluation Guidelines, UNEG Norms and Stand for Evaluations (2016) and in consultations with UNDP Country Office, the evaluation will be participatory, involving relevant stakeholders.

The evaluation will be conducted by the Evaluation team composed of an International Evaluation Consultant (Evaluation Team Leader) and National Evaluation Consultant.

The National Evaluation Consultant will bear responsibility for providing support to the Evaluation Team Leader in conducting the final project evaluation, in line with the evaluative approaches/ methodologies agreed and proposed in the Evaluation Inception Report, to implement the evaluation effectively in the COVID – 19 pandemics circumstances, including application of safety guidance, extended desk reviews and virtual stakeholder meetings and interviews.

The proposed methodology may employ any relevant and appropriate quantitative, qualitative or combined methods to conduct the Project Evaluation, exploring specific, gender sensitive data collecting and analytical methods and tools applicable in the concrete case. Together with the Evaluation Team Leader, the National Evaluation Consultant is expected to creatively combine the standard and other evaluation tools and technics to ensure maximum reliability of data and validity of the evaluation findings.

Limitations to the chosen approach/methodology and methods shall be made explicit by the Evaluation team and the consequences of these limitations discussed in the tender. The Evaluation team shall to the extent possible, present mitigation measures to address them. A clear distinction is to be made between evaluation approach/methodology and methods. A gender responsive approach/methodology, methods, tools and data analysis techniques should be used.

The National Evaluation Consultant is expected to facilitate the entire evaluation process with careful consideration of how everything that is done will affect the use of the evaluation. It is therefore expected that the evaluators, in their application, present the methodology on i) how intended users are to participate in and contribute to the evaluation process and ii) methodology and methods for data collection that create space for reflection, discussion and learning between the intended users of the evaluation.

In cases where sensitive or confidential issues are to be addressed in the evaluation, evaluators should ensure an evaluation design that do not put informants and stakeholders at risk during the data collection phase or the dissemination phase.

Standard UNDP evaluation methodology would suggest the following data collecting methods:   

  • Desk review: Following the initial meeting, the National Evaluation Consultant will support the Evaluation Team Leader in conducting a detailed review of all relevant documents produced during project implementation. Documentation includes but is not limited to the project materials and deliverables including the Project Document, theory of change and results framework, monitoring and project quality assurance reports, annual workplans, consolidated progress reports, studies and publications produced by the project etc. An extensive list of documents for desk review is provided in Annex 3.
  • Key informant interviews: Using virtual technological solutions, the National Evaluation Consultant will help the Evaluation Team Leader remotely interview representatives of main institutional partners, Swedish Governments and UNDP, other relevant stakeholders and partners. For the interviews, the evaluators are expected to design evaluation questions around relevance, effectiveness, efficiency and sustainability criteria, according to different stakeholders to be interviewed. Detailed list of main stakeholders that may be considered for meetings is provided in Annex 2.
  • Meetings / focus group discussions with relevant stakeholders will be conducted remotely.
  • Other methodologies, as appropriate, such as case studies, statistical analysis, social network analysis, etc. Skype interviews, mobile questionnaires, online surveys, collaboration platforms (slack or yammer) and satellite imagery are recommended to be used to gather data. Stakeholders that are dealing with existing emergencies should be given advance notice.
  • Field visits will be additionally considered, depending on the officially noted epidemiological situation related to the COVID-19 pandemic, and with compliance to all epidemiological measures effective in the country.

As an integral part of the evaluation report and specifically under the impact criteria, the National Evaluation Consultant, together with the Evaluation Team Leader will review the project effects and impact on its target groups. In this context and using the online survey, the consultancy is expected to gain insights from both the partners and the beneficiaries.

Stakeholders involvement: During the evaluation process, the National Evaluation Consultant together with the Evaluation Team Leader, is expected to talk to senior representatives of the UNDP, Government of Sweden and the project team, key partners and stakeholders. Initial briefing and evaluation debriefing to obtain the critical feedback on the evaluation report, are envisaged. To assess project performance, approach and modalities, the Evaluation Team Leader will talk with the members of project board, Ministry of Foreign Trade and Economic Relations, both entity Environmental Funds. In addition, the views of representatives of Ministry of energy and environmental protection, as well as representatives of Sarajevo Canton government, and Banja Luka City will be considered to obtain critical insight and information on the project activities and results. During these meetings, it would be important to record and accumulate inputs necessary not only for the project evaluation, but also to highlight recommendations and advise on potential project follow-up phase.

The expected duration of the assignment is up to 22 work-days, in the period November/December 2020.

III.Evaluation tasks / deliverables:

Following the initial briefing and a detailed desk review, the National Evaluation Consultant will help the Evaluation Team Leader deliver the following products and tasks:

  • Inception Report (10-15 pages) will be presented before the evaluation starts, showing how each evaluation question will be answered by proposing methods, sources of data and data collection procedures. The Inception Report should elaborate an evaluation matrix (provided in Annex 4) for the project and propose a schedule of tasks, activities and evaluation deliverables. The Evaluation Inception Report should follow the structure proposed in the UNDP Evaluation Guidelines, p. 22-23.
  • Evaluation and data collection: Upon the approval of the Inception Report and the evaluation work plan by the UNDP, the National Evaluation Consultant will help the Evaluation Team Leader carry out the project evaluation. Data collecting methodologies presented in the Evaluation Inception Report should limit the exposure of any consultant, project team member, beneficiary or stakeholder to the pandemic, therefore, strongly recommended is use of remote and virtual methodologies.
  • Draft Evaluation Report: Based on the findings generated through desk review and data collection process, the National Evaluation Consultant will support the Evaluation Team Leader prepare and submit the Draft Evaluation Report to the UNDP team and key stakeholders for review. Structure of the Report is outlined in Annex 5.
  • Evaluation review process (and eventual dispute settlement): Comments, questions, suggestions and requests for clarification on the evaluation draft will be submitted to the Evaluation Team Leader and the National Evaluation Consultant and addressed in the agreed timeframe. The Evaluation Team should reply to the comments through the evaluation audit trail document[1]. If there is disagreement in findings, these should be documented through the evaluation audit trail, while effort should be made to come to an agreement.
  • Evaluation debriefings: will be held with UNDP Bosnia and Herzegovina, Government of Sweden representatives and other key stakeholders to present main findings and recommendations in a form of a Skype briefing. In addition, short briefings on immediate findings with UNDP senior management will be considered after completion of the initial assessment.
  • Evaluation Report (maximum 50 pages of the main body) should be logically structured (structure of the Evaluation Report is outlined in Annex 5 of this Terms of Reference), contain data and evidence-based findings, conclusions, lessons and recommendations, and be presented in a way that makes the information accessible and comprehensible. Finally, based on the evaluation findings and in a distinct report section, the Evaluation Team will provide forward-looking actionable recommendations, outlining key strategic priorities to be addressed in the potential next phase of the project.[2]

UNDP Evaluation Guidelines Note: As of 11 March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 a global pandemic as the new coronavirus rapidly spread to all regions of the world. If it is not possible to travel to or within the country for the evaluation then the evaluation team should develop a methodology that takes this into account the conduct of the evaluation virtually and remotely, including the use of remote interview methods and extended desk reviews, data analysis, surveys and evaluation questionnaires. This should be detailed in the Inception report and agreed with the Evaluation Manager.

If all or part of the evaluation is to be carried out virtually then consideration should be taken for stakeholder availability, ability or willingness to be interviewed remotely. In addition, their accessibility to the internet/ computer may be an issue as many government and national counterparts may be working from home. These limitations must be reflected in the evaluation report.

If a data collection/field mission is not possible then remote interviews may be undertaken through telephone or online (skype, zoom etc.). International consultants can work remotely with national evaluator support in the field if it is safe for them to operate and travel. No stakeholders, consultants or UNDP staff should be put in harm’s way and safety is the key priority.

A short validation mission may be considered if it is confirmed to be safe for staff, consultants, stakeholders and if such a mission is possible within the evaluation schedule. 

Deliverables/outputs

#

Deliverables / Outputs

# of Days per Task

Due Date

Percentage

 1.

- Initial meeting with the Project owners and Desk review of reference material,Responsible party: Consultants/Evaluation Reference Groups;- Inception report including detailed evaluation work-plan,Responsible party: Consultants

5

November 09. 2020.

22.73%

 2.

-  Evaluation and data collection,Responsible party: Consultants;- Debriefing session held,Responsible party: Consultants/Evaluation Reference Groups;- Development of the 1st evaluation draft report,Responsible party: Consultants;- Evaluation review process,Responsible party: Evaluation Reference Groups;- Development of the 2nd evaluation draft report,Responsible party: Consultants

12

November 30. 2020.

54.54%

 3.

- Evaluation Report review process,Responsible party: Evaluation Reference Groups / Donors;- Submission of the Final Evaluation Report,Responsible party: Consultants;- Submission of the Evaluation Summary with findings and recommendations from the main Report,Responsible party: Consultants;- Submission of the Power Point Presentation of the evaluation report,Responsible party: Consultants

5

December 15. 2020.

22.73%

 

In line with the UNDP’s financial regulations, when determined by the Country Office and/or the consultant that a deliverable or service cannot be satisfactorily completed due to the impact of COVID-19 and limitations to the evaluation, that deliverable or service will not be paid. Due to the current COVID-19 situation and its implications, a partial payment may be considered if the consultant invested time towards the deliverable but was unable to complete to circumstances beyond his/her control.

[1] Template available at http://web.undp.org/evaluation/guideline/documents/PDF/UNDP_Evaluation_Guidelines.pdf, p. 25

[2] Evaluation Report Template available at http://web.undp.org/evaluation/guideline/documents/PDF/UNDP_Evaluation_Guidelines.pdf, p.49

Competencies

Core values

The evaluation will be conducted by the Evaluation team composed of an International Evaluation Consultant/Evaluation Team Leader and National Evaluation Consultant. The Evaluation Team Leader will lead the evaluation process and decide on planning and distribution of the evaluation workload and tasks. She/he will closely collaborate with the National Consultant who will provide support throughout the evaluation process.  

The National Evaluation Consultant will bear responsibility for providing support to the Evaluation Team Leader in conducting the final project evaluation. This entails: providing support in designing the evaluation process according to this terms of reference; preparing the Evaluation Inception Report; undertaking a rigorous desk review; gathering data from different sources of information; analyzing, organizing and triangulating the collected information; responding to comments and factual corrections from stakeholders and incorporating them, as appropriate, in subsequent versions; and making briefs and presentations ensuring the evaluation findings, conclusions and recommendations are communicated in a coherent, clear and understandable manner.

Core values

  • Demonstrates integrity and fairness by modelling UN values and ethical standards;
  • Displays cultural, gender, religion, race, nationality and age sensitivity and adaptability.

Core competencies

  • Demonstrates professional competence to meet responsibilities and post requirements and is conscientious and efficient in meeting commitments, observing deadlines and achieving results;
  • Results-Orientation: Plans and produces quality results to meet established goals, generates innovative, practical solutions to challenging situations;
  • Communication: Excellent communication skills, including the ability to convey complex concepts and recommendations, both orally and in writing, in a clear and persuasive style tailored to match different audiences;
  • Team work: Ability to interact, establish and maintain effective working relations with a culturally diverse team;

Client orientation: Ability to establish and maintain productive partnerships with national partners and stakeholders and pro-activeness in identifying of beneficiaries and partners’ needs and matching them to appropriate solutions.

Required Skills and Experience

Academic Qualifications/Education:

  • Advanced university degree in economics, finance, energy and/or buildings science, or a related discipline;

Experience:

  • At least 5 years of extensive project/programme evaluation experience, with evaluations in the area of energy efficiency and green development;
  • Sound knowledge of results-based management systems, and gender-sensitive monitoring and evaluation methodologies.
  • Knowledge of financial mechanisms for energy efficiency investments, and the EU acquis within this area.
  • Knowledge and experience in the area of environment, climate change and energy management.
  • General understanding and knowledge of the political and administrative context in Bosnia and Herzegovina is necessary.
  • Previous experience in remote evaluation is an asset

Languages Requirements:

  • Fluency in English language.

Other Requirements:

  • Excellent computer skills (MS Office applications) and ability to use information technologies as a tool and resource.

Longlisting/Shortlisting Criteria

Qualifications as stated in the ToR

Criteria:

Points

Advanced university degree in economics, finance, energy and/or buildings science, or a related discipline.

max 40 percent(20% allocated for BA/BSc degree, 30% for Master’s degree and PhD degree 40%)

At least 5 years of extensive project/programme evaluation expertise and experience, with evaluations in the area of energy efficiency and green development in the Western Balkan region and Countries with transitional economy (preferably in Bosnia)

max 60 percent 

Only candidates obtaining a minimum of 70 points would be considered for Technical Evaluation

Technical Evaluation Criteria

Criteria:

Points

Criterion A: Qualification Score

20%

Criterion B:

  • Sound knowledge of results-based management systems, and gender-sensitive monitoring and evaluation methodologies;
  • Knowledge of financial mechanisms for EE investments, and the EU acquis within this area.
  • Excellent knowledge of monitoring and evaluation methodologies; sound judgment and ability to objectively evaluate projects in terms of processes, as well as results achieved (evidenced through previously conducted evaluations and references)General understanding and knowledge of the political/administrative and development context in Bosnia and Herzegovina;
  • Sound knowledge of results-based management systems, and gender-sensitive monitoring and evaluation methodologies;
  • Knowledge and experience in the area of environment, climate change and EE;
  • General understanding and knowledge of the political and administrative context in BiH is necessary

50%

Criterion C:

  • Proposal (outlining the specific design and methods for the evaluation):
    • Explaining why they are the most suitable for the work;
    • Providing a brief methodology on how they will approach and conduct the work;
    • the methodology should present the Consultant’s approach, proposed detailed methods, scope and evaluation criteria and questions;
    • the methodology should apply a mixed-method approach collecting both quantitative and qualitative data to validate and triangulate data;
    • the methodology should include the filled in evaluation matrix (Annex 3);the methodology should explain the data collection tool/s to be used.

30%

Only candidates obtaining a minimum of 70 points would be considered for the Financial Evaluation

Final Evaluation

The final evaluation score will be based on Combined Scoring Method where technical evaluation will be weighted a maximum of 70% and combined with the financial offer which will be weighted a maximum of 30%.

Evaluation

Individual  will be evaluated based on the following methodology:

Cumulative analysis

When using this weighted scoring method, the award of the contract should be made to the candidate whose offer has been evaluated and determined as:a) responsive/compliant/acceptable, andb) Having received the highest score out of a pre-determined set of weighted technical and financial criteria specific to the solicitation.

  • * Technical Criteria weight-70%
  • * Financial Criteria weight- 30%

Interested candidated must submit the following documents/information to demonstrate their qualifications:

Proposal (outlining the specific design and methods for the evaluation):

  • Explaining why they are the most suitable for the work;
  • Providing a brief methodology on how they will approach and conduct the work;
  • the methodology should present the Consultant’s approach, proposed detailed methods, scope and evaluation criteria and questions;
  • the methodology should apply a mixed-method approach collecting both quantitative and qualitative data to validate and triangulate data;
  • the methodology should include the filled in evaluation matrix (Annex 3);
  • the methodology should explain the data collection tool/s to be used. Provide a brief methodology on how they will approach and conduct the work; or sample of previous document/strategy/paper done by the consultant.

Please scan all above mentioned documents and upload as one attachment only online through this website.

Note:

  • For an assignment requiring travel, consultants of 65 years or more require full medical examination and statement of fitness to work to engage in the consultancy.
  • Due to large number of potential applicants, only competitively selected candidates will be contacted for remaining steps of the service procurement process.
We do our best to provide you the most accurate info, but closing dates may be wrong on our site. Please check on the recruiting organization's page for the exact info. Candidates are responsible for complying with deadlines and are encouraged to submit applications well ahead.
Before applying, please make sure that you have read the requirements for the position and that you qualify.
Applications from non-qualifying applicants will most likely be discarded by the recruiting manager.
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